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20121205
20121213
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're looking for help. >> susie: and house speaker boehner accuses president obama of wasting another week in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the job market is proving to be surprisingly resilient. american employers hired 146,000 workers in november, much more than expected. and the unemployment rate fell to 7.7%, the lowest level since december of 2008. as erika miller reports, that wasn't the only surprise in today's report. >> reporter: almost no one on wall street saw this good news coming. there was every reason to think hiring would be weak last month. after all, many parts of the east coast are still recovering from devastation caused by superstorm sandy. >> i think the most likely explanation here is sandy's impact was significant but was so short-lived that it didn't extend to the sample period of the employment report which was the week that covered november 12. >> reporter: hiring was also supposed to be weak due to worries about the fiscal cliff. with $600 billion in automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts set to sta
the white house a counterproposal in response to a new plan president obama offered up privately yesterday. a boehner aide said the g.o.p. is waiting for the president to identify spending cuts, a point the speaker made on the house floor earlier today while white house press secretary jay carney called on republicans to get serious about revenue. >>here are the psint's spenng cuts? the longer the white house slow-walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. now, if the president doesn't agree with our approach, he's got an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering when is the president going to get serious? >> on that question of whether or not we have put forward specific spending cuts, the answer is is we have. not only that, we signed law a trillion dollars in specific spending cuts. so if you combine what is signed into law with what we proposed versus the total absence of any specificity from the republicans for a single dollar in revenue,
. at the home of what the white house called a typical middle class family, mr. obama said he's optimistic that agreement can be reached, but again drew a hard line for republicans in congress. >> everybody's is going to have to share in some sacrifice. but it starts with folks who are in the best position to sacrifice. who are in the best position to step up . just to be clear i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevents the top rate from going up, the top 2% from going up. >> woodruff: the president phoned house speaker john boehner yesterday, their first direct talk in almost a week. but today white house spokesman jay carney wouldn't share details of the call. >> we believe it's in the interest of achieving an agreement not to do that. >> reporter: treasury secretary timothy geithner said yesterday the white house was absolutely willing to go over the cliff if republicans held firm in their opposition to raising rates on the wealthy. but it was the administration's other demand-- to give the president authority over the nation's debt ceiling that roiled tempers on capitol hi
, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the republicans may present. but we are not going to simply cut our way to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from new revenues but with no hike in tax rates for top earners. instead the plan reles on .2 trillion in reduced spending including $600 billion from changes in medicare and medicaid. at the white house today, the president met with a bipartisan group of governors pressing his own plan for deficit reduction. that proposal, $1.6 trillion in revenue from ta
after super-storm sandy wreaked havoc along the new jersey shore, president obama met today with governor chris christie at the white house. the topic-- federal aid for storm recovery. the president is expected to ask congress for about $50 billion in additional emergency assistance. ruben ramirez is in seaside heights, new jersey, where business owners are striving to recover. ruben? >> reporter: thanks, tom. yes, nearly six weeks after super-storm sandy devastated this barrier island off the coast of new jersey, there's still a curfew in place. a lot of the traffic you see behind me is a lot of those longtime residents from the island and business owners who have bn going back day in and day out, trying to recover and repair whatever's left. some of those business owners we had a chance to speak to today. they say they'll reopen come next summer. >> you've kbchb in business 33 years, have you seen this sort of devastation before. >> no, nothing like this. we-- that's the reason we stayed because they were explaining that there was going to be a terrible storm. but we, of t
stalemated over how to avoid automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, come january. house speaker john boehner did speak by phone to president obama this week, and it was widely reported the two have agreed to negotiate directly with each other. but boehner said today, "there's no progress to report." >> four days ago, we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there's been no counteroffer from the white house. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow-walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> sreenivasan: the president has insisted there will be no deal unless republicans agree to raise tax rates on the top 2%. republicans say the tax hikes would only hurt job creation. but in arlington, virginia, vice president biden said today's jobs report shows the economy is turning a corner, so it's critical to get a deal. >> there is a sense... there is a sense that if we can reach an- - act like adults and reach an agreement here on the fiscal cliff, the upside is much higher e
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6